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Posts Tagged ‘horseradish’

A Motley Autumnal Conglomerate

I’ve been digging through my backlog of photos and I’ve found a bunch of single random ones that more-or-less fall into the category of “fall harvest.”  So this is going to be a bit of a hodgepodge of a post.  (yeah, somebody’s gotten into the thesaurus again)

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The first snowfall of the year.  The Cities were eerily quiet that day.

Throughout summer and fall, Lindz was making semi-regular stops at the local farmer’s market and on one trip she picked up some gorgeous sweetcorn.

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Still working on “prettyfying” some of my photos.

The most consistent way I’ve found to cook sweetcorn is to get a pot of water boiling, add the corn, and let it come back up to a full boil.  I then let it cook for about a minute and then pull it out.  This way the corn is still nice and juicy but doesn’t taste raw either.

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Juuust about ready to be pulled out, buttered, lightly salted, and devoured.

I think it was the same trip that Lindz also picked up some delightful green beans.  These I steam for about five minutes (checking often) so they come out nice and al dente.  Toss with a pat of butter and a pinch each of salt and pepper.

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I love green beans, even if most people cook them to mush.

I enjoy sausages anytime that I can get my grubby little hands on them, but for whatever reason, I always think of them as cold weather comfort food.  I think they are best with either a spicy mustard or some horseradish (preferably homemade).

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A Hobbit approved snack. Perfect for second breakfast.

My boss, Steve, has really been into canning the last couple of years.  This year he was working on perfecting his pickle recipe.  He found a spicy pickle mix (I think it’s this one) at Mill’s Fleet Farm and gave me a jar to try.  It definitely packed a nice punch of jalapeno with a good and crisp pickle.  It was one of those nice burns that wasn’t too overpowering, but stayed with you for some time.  The more you ate, the more intense it got too.

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They look innocent, but they will grab your tastebuds and mistreat them in a way that will have you coming back for seconds. And thirds.

Mom picked up a half bushel box of peaches this fall and make most of it into jam.  It didn’t last very long once Lindz and I opened it and got a taste.

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Yes, Mom has been reusing jars for canning and pickling long before it was in vogue.

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You can just taste the peachy peachness of the peach jam, can’t you?

Along with the usual jellies and jams that Mom made, she also did some salsa this year.  Generally, I’m not a fan because the flavor usually seems dull and overcooked.  Probably the same thing.  This primarily applies to store-bought salsas.  I prefer a nice pico de gallo (fresh uncooked salsa) any day of the week.  However, the recipe that Mom used has me hesitating on my anti-salsa stance.  It was a bit sweet (from the tomatoes), a bit spicy (just enough to round out the flavor), and a whole lot of tomatoey goodness.

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Mmm, salsa. Cha-cha-cha!

And now for something completely different: Oreos.

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I’m a die-hard fan of the original Double Stuff, but these are surprising good. And a nice change to throw into the mix.

Maverick’s

As seems to be the case all too often lately, by the time that I got home from work it was late and neither of us had any energy to make something for supper. Lindz was kind enough to run out and grab us some food. After running through the list of places nearby, we both decided that Maverick’s sounded the best.

Maverick’s Real Roast Beef is a small Mom & Pop BBQ place on Lexington Ave by Larpenteur. There is nothing fancy about their food, it’s just plain good. And good plain. (Notice that word play? I’m so clever! And I most certainly didn’t steal it from the CityPages review.) Also it’s very reasonably priced to boot. Although they are equally good, I usually get the brisket basket and Lindz gets the roast beef basket. The bonus for me is that they have a really good horseradish sauce that you can put on your sandwich. I grew up with homemade horseradish, so I am particular when it comes to this condiment. You should read that last sentence as “I am a horseradish snob.”

Not the greatest shot, but I was hungry. BTW, this is the brisket. The Horsey Sauce is top center. Yum.

To sum up, this is a place that deserves your business and you deserve to eat there.

Horseradish-Crusted Beef Tenderloin

Computer is fixed.  Break in work.  So back to posting!

I love to watch America’s Test Kitchen.  In my ever so humble opinion, it is the only real cooking show on TV these days (I’m not counting reruns of anything Julia Child).  Don’t get me wrong, I love to watch Food Network, it’s just that they tend to be more song and dance than substance.  One of my favorites is a prime example of this, Guy Fieri with Triple D and Guy’s Big Bite.  Both very entertaining and interesting shows, but not too big on the whole learning experience.

I saw this a little while ago and I thought it sounded really good.

Horseradish-Crusted Beef Roast

The recipe calls for a cut of beef called a Châteaubriand which is basically the center third of a whole tenderloin.  Since I’m basically flat broke and cannot afford such a cut, I substituted a top round roast that I stole from my parents.  I rolled it up and tied it off with some kitchen string so that it had the right shape.  I also tweaked some of spices because I didn’t have what they called for.  Namely, I used dried herbs instead of fresh ones.  I will post the recipe as I made it.  If you want the original recipe it can be found on p. 636-7 in The Complete America’s Test Kitchen TV Show Cookbook 2001-2011. (See future post)

Ingredients

  • 2 lb Top Round Roast trimmed of fat and silver skin, rolled and tied into a log
  • Kosher Salt
  • 3 Tbs Panko (Japanese-style bread crumbs)
  • 1 C plus 2 tsp Vegetable Oil
  • 1 1/4 tsp Ground Black Pepper
  • 1 Tbs Onion minced
  • 6 Garlic Cloves, pressed through a garlic press
  • 1/4 C prepared Horseradish, well drained
  • 2 Tbs Italian Seasoning (mix of parsley, rosemary, thyme, etc)
  • 1 small Russet Potato (about 6 oz) peeled and grated on the large holes of a box grater
  • 1 1/2 tsp Mayonnaise
  • 1 1/2 tsp Yellow Mustard
  • 1/2 tsp powdered Gelatin (can substitute an egg white wash)

Sprinkle the roast with 1 Tbs salt, cover with plastic wrap, and let stand at room temperature for 1 hour.  This is season the meat and draw out a bit of the moisture.

Toss the bread crumbs with 2 tsp of oil, 1/4 tsp salt, and 1/4 tsp black pepper in a 10″ skillet.  Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until deep golden brown.  About 3 to 5 minutes.  Transfer to a cookie sheet and cool to room temperature.  Wipe out the skillet.  Once cool, toss the bread crumbs with the onion, garlic, 2 Tbs of horseradish, and the Italian Seasoning.

Rinse the grated potato under cold water, then squeeze dry in a kitchen towel.  Transfer the potatoes and remaining cup of oil to the skillet.  Cook over high heat, stirring frequently, until golden-brown and crisp.  About 6 to 8 minutes.  Using a slotted spoon transfer the potatoes to a paper towel-lined plate and season lightly with salt.  Let cool for 5 minutes.  Reserve 1 Tbs of oil and discard the rest.  Once the potatoes are cool, crush until coarsely ground.  Transfer the potatoes to the cookie sheet and combine.

Pat the exterior of the roast dry with paper towels and sprinkle evenly with the remaining tsp of pepper.  Heat the reserved Tbs of oil in the skillet  on medium-high until the oil is just smoking.  Sear the roast on all sides until it is well browned, about 5 to 7 minutes.  Transfer the roast to a wire rack over a plate and let it rest for 10 minutes.

Combine the remaining 2 Tbs of horseradish, mayo, and mustard in a small bowl.  Just before coating the roast, add the gelatin and stir to combine.  Spread the horseradish paste on the top and sides of the roast, leaving the bottom and ends bare.  Roll the coated sides of the roast in the bread-crumb mixture.  Press gently so the crumbs adhere in an even layer that just covers the horseradish paste.  Pat off any excess.

Return the roast to an oven-proof skillet and roast until a thermometer inserted into the center reads (approximately) 135 degrees for  medium.  About 40 minutes.

Transfer the roast to a carving board and let rest for 20 minutes.  Carefully cut the meat crosswise in 1/2″ slices and serve.  Note: I did have some difficulty removing the strings from under the crust coating.  A different possibility to try would be to use toothpicks to hold the roast in the proper shape.

I ended up only using about half of bread-crumb mixture.  I just pan fried the rest for a couple of minutes on medium heat and used it as a topping.

I oven roasted some potatoes, broccoli, carrots, garlic, and white onion as the side.  Just toss the veggies lightly with some olive oil and season to taste with salt and pepper.  In this case I roasted them with the meat at 400 degrees for approximately 40 minutes.  I pulled them out when the potatoes were fork tender.

Oven Roasted Veggies

The Whole Sha-Bang.

Supper was served and everyone enjoyed.  Ok, it was only me and Lindz, but it still was very tasty.