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Posts Tagged ‘peanut’

Christmas Fruit and a Citrus Kick in the Ol’ Boxers

I had forgotten about a particular tradition until Lindz visited one of her professors before Christmas.  Her professor receives a box of citrus from one of his former students every year during Advent.  When Lindz showed up to visit, he had just gotten his yearly present and he realized that he couldn’t eat it all before it went bad.  So, Lindz ended up with a box of fruit.

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The Red Navel oranges (in the red tissue) were by far the best ones. Sweet, but with a prominent citrus tang.

The tradition that I forgot about was the giving of a certain bag of “goodies” at Christmas time.  This bag consists of an orange (maybe an apple too), nuts in the shell (usually peanuts), and some form of candy (candy canes, old fashioned ribbon candy, chocolate coins, etc).  With a bit of research on the good ol’ internet, I found that a lot of people used to get these in their stocking from their parents.  Personally, I received it from our priest every year as a youngster.  I’ve heard of this custom off and on over the years, but never knew the origin.  I’ve always assumed that it was a “healthy” and/or “inexpensive” gift.  But the more that I heard about it, it slowly dawned on me that this wasn’t just a local Catholic thing, it was far more widespread phenomenon.  This year I finally took the time to do the research.  It turns out that the actual origins are pretty murky.  Frustrating, but not surprising.  On the web, a lot of people remember this as a kid, and many continue it with their own children.  Most people are comfortable with the answer of “I don’t know.  It was just something that grandma (or whomever) always did.”  They assume that it either came from the old country, (Italy, Poland, England, etc) or it dates back to the time when oranges were a rarity and hence an actual treat, or some combination of these two factors.  While I can see these two reasons being factors, it just didn’t feel right for how widespread and long lasting this experience is.

Wiki to the rescue!

In his (St. Nicholas) most famous exploit, a poor man had three daughters but could not afford a proper dowry for them. This meant that they would remain unmarried and probably, in absence of any other possible employment, would have to become prostitutes . Hearing of the poor man’s plight, Nicholas decided to help him . . . and drops the third bag down the chimney (where) the daughter had washed her stockings that evening and hung them over the embers to dry, and that the bag of gold fell into the stocking.

Ok, but how do we get from a bag of gold to an orange?  Here is where symbolism comes into effect.  The best explanation is that an orange is a similar color to gold and that oranges are similar in shape to bags of the shiny stuff.  Also, in some European countries, oranges have symbolized Jesus’ love for the world.  I’ve listed a bunch of the more interesting links that I’ve found at the end of this post.

Now that the history lesson is over, on to the food!

We weren’t eating the box of oranges as fast as we should have and they were in real danger of going bad.  So I had to come up with something to use a whole bunch of oranges at once.  I’ve had a venison loin sitting in the freezer since last fall and it seemed like it would be a perfect pairing for an orange pan sauce that I had in mind.

Since the sauce was going to be the star of the show, I simply cut the loin into medallions and pan fried them in a bit of oil.

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I’m not sure why I keep posting pics of frying meat, but it always look so good.  Well, that I love to see my cast irons being used.

As a side, I went with roasted potatoes, carrots, onions, and garlic all mashed up together.

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I really love roasted root veggies and mashing them up makes for a nice variation. Especially if you plan on putting some kind of sauce on them.

Once the venison was fried off and resting, I made the pan sauce.  The recipe that I borrowed quite heavily from is the Orange Pan Sauce with Middle Eastern Spices from the Cook’s Illustrated cookbook.  I really wanted the sauce to be a “Friday-night-drunken-barroom-brawl” explosion in your mouth, so I went very heavy on the OJ and zest.

Ingredients:

  • 2 Shallots, minced
  • 2 tsp Sugar
  • 1 tsp Ground Cumin
  • 1/4 tsp Pepper
  • 1/4 tsp Ground Cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp Ground Cardamom
  • 1/8 tsp Cayenne Pepper
  • 1/4 C Orange Zest
  • 3 Tbs Red Wine Vinegar
  • 2 C Orange Juice
  • Salt

Pour off all but 1 1/2 Tbs fat from the skillet (of whatever meat you are making).  Place skillet over medium heat.  Add shallots and cook until softened, about 1 minute.  Stir in sugar, cumin, pepper, cinnamon, cardamom, and cayenne; cook until fragrant, about 1 minute.  Stir in vinegar, scraping bottom of pan with a wooden spoon to loosen the fond.  Add the orange juice, increase heat to medium-high and simmer until reduced to about 3/4 C, about 10 to 15 minutes.  Off heat, season with salt to taste.  Spoon over meat and serve.

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Yes, it tasted even better than it looks.

I managed to create the citrus barrage that I was intending.  Plus, the other spices weren’t lost in all of the citric acid.  They were a nice background note in the sauce.  What is even better, is that the sauce worked equally well on both the meat and the roasted veggie mash.  All in all, I was quite pleased with this meal.  In fact, I am hoping the bag of lemons that we have in the fridge right now linger around a bit so I have an excuse to try this with a different citrus.

p.s.  Sorry if there is less snark in this post than usual.  Lindz has been hoarding our household’s share of it lately.

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An informative page, with emphasis on the Canadian Prairies.

A well-researched page (much more effort than I put into mine) that is a nice narrative.

This page looks at this Christmas tradition with regard to its English origin.

A sugar- and food-centric page that emphasizes the sweet and preservative aspect of fruit.

An interesting audio story from Minnesota Public Radio about the impact of a couple from Minnesota and their influence on the Christmas orange tradition here.

A not very helpful page with regards to Christmas oranges, but a still very interesting read.

A wonderful page full of Polish Christmas time traditions.

Another Beautiful Selection from Pizza Luce

This is from the last time that Lindz and I went to Pizza Lucé.  One of their specials of the month was a Thai Chicken pizza.  Being the lover of Asian food that I am, it was an easy choice.

Despite all the jalapenos, it was surprisingly mild in it’s heat.

This is a great combination.  I really wish they would put it on the regular menu.  It was a nice balance of what you would expect from something labeled “Thai.”  Crunchy peanuts with some heat from peppers (I know jalapenos are not the usual choice, but they worked) and some herby basil to round things out.

It was a great game. As long as you weren’t a Twins fan.

On the 24th, a group of us went to the Twins v. Red Sox game.  I’ll say the painful part first.  The Twins lost 11-2.  They were already losing at the fifth pitch.  Yeah, you read that right.  Fifth pitch.  The first batter up (Mike Aviles) got a double off of the third pitch and makes it home when Ryan Sweeney hit a single off of his second pitch.  After that the game just went into a downward spiral.  But, hey, we were at Target Field watching baseball!  If you do get a chance, watch a game there, it’s worth it.  One of the promo things they were saying while they were building it was that there was “not going to be a bad seat in the whole stadium.”  I have to say that I completely agree with it.  Granted, I’ve only been to two games, but it still holds true with everyone else that I’ve talked to about it.  The first time we were in the lower deck past third.  A bit more expensive of a seat, but a great view.  This last time we were in the nosebleed section, i.e. upper deck.  Again off third base.  Even though you almost got vertigo looking down, you could see everything easily.  Even across the whole ballpark to right field.  Twenty-ish years ago when I went and saw the Twinkies play in the Metrodome (a.k.a. The Big Inflatable Toilet (thank you 93X)), I was in the nosebleed section too.  You practically needed binoculars just to see the near end of the field.  So yes, the new stadium is an exponentially better experience.  Plus there is the food and beer.

Looking down from our seats. Objects in the photo are much closer than they appear. In other words, a pretty decent view of the field.

 

From left to right: the jumbo-tron, Minnie and Paul shaking hands, Minneapolis skyline, and some building with the Target dog on it.

I don’t remember what they call them now, but they used to be the Dome-dogs. The one with all of the crap on it is mine. The other one is Lindsay’s. Duh.

And it comes with a bag of chips complete with the Twins logo. That’s extra, you know.

Lindz in her kid-sized jersey that was half the price and fit better than the woman’s version. That’s Dave in his jersey in the background. There will be posts featuring him in the future, whether he likes it or not.

But more importantly, Lindz is holding my beer. A very nice Surly Belgian White.

Nachos. Need I say more?

Finally, there were the peanuts. Strangely, this was the most satisfying food I had that game.